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A pitch has been booked for what could very well be the first trip of the season for me. Its to the island of Bornholm, which is in the Baltic Sea. Later on today, I'll be looking for a berth on the inevitable ferry.

 

At long last, my Crit'air has arrived. Now, I'll start booking the main holiday. As some of this will be in France, that means a trip to a store her that I call "Codgers Kindergarten" to get the required Alco tester and external bulbs that are required when travelling in France.

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11 minutes ago, Scania said:

As some of this will be in France, that means a trip to a store here that I call "Codgers Kindergarten" to get the required Alco tester and external bulbs that are required when travelling in France.

It's always a good idea to carry spare bulbs if they are replaceable on your vehicle however while you are required to carry a breathalyzer in France, apparently there is no penalty for not doing so. I bought one when the law changed and it has rattled around in the glovebox ever since, so is probably out of date by now anyway.

Something that is more likely to cause problems if you're not aware of it, is the reduction of the national speed limit throughout France on single carriageways from 90km/h to 80km/h unless otherwise stated. See here.

 

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Thanks for the link to the speed limits. I was only partially aware of the 80kph one, and what it applied to. Now I know for certain.

 

I'm under the impression that bulbs for external lights are a legal requirement in France. At least, according to our version of the AA/RAC they are. Not sure if LED's or other modern ones are included though.

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I believe the rules refer to "bulbs" in which case it probably excludes LEDs as they're less likely to fail, and can be more difficult to replace quickly. After a trawl around the Internet I found the text below. Now my French is not perfect by any means but I think the meaning is clear. Not carrying spare bulbs is not an offence itself, but if a bulb blows, not being able to replace it is an offence - so you do need a spare bulbs for all road lights on your vehicle.

 

La boîte d’ampoules de rechange est-elle obligatoire ?

La réponse des policiers:

A cette question, la plupart des policiers nous ont répondu par l’affirmative. Aussi Ils dite qu’ils n’hésiteraient pas à délivrer une amende l’automobiliste qui ne pourrait remplacer l’ampoule défectueuse.

La réglementation:

Donc, la boîte d’ampoules de rechange, contrairement à ce que beaucoup d’automobilistes et la plupart des policiers semblent croire, n’est pas obligatoire. Mais ce il y est précisé que si une ampoule est grillée sur le véhicule, l’automobiliste doit être à même de la remplacer séance tenante.

Police conseil, achetez ce genre d’accessoire et glissez-le dans votre boîte à gants.

 

My translation:-

Is the box of replacement bulbs obligatory?

The police response:

In response to this question, most police officers responded by saying yes. They also said they would not hesitate to issue a fine to the motorist who could not replace the defective bulb.

Regulations:

So the box of spare bulbs, contrary to what many motorists and most police seem to believe, is not mandatory. But the rules say that if a vehicle bulb is blown, the driver must be able to replace it immediately.

Police advise you to buy this kind of accessory and keep it in your glove box.

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Thanks for that Gordon. My french is not the best, so it was good to read the translation.

 

I'll be checking out which bulbs are actually used and possible to change by the roadside, then get a kit at the weekend.

 

If there is one thing that tends to spoil motorhome travel nowadays its all of the regulations we have to be aware of.

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1 hour ago, Scania said:

If there is one thing that tends to spoil motorhome travel nowadays its all of the regulations we have to be aware of.

And they vary from country to country within the EU - deep joy eh?

Gordon.

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Only a minor setback on the MOT, leaking front suspension strut and small repair needed on front chassis rail, when and if it ever stops raining I can get under it and get busy.

Can't complain for a 21yr old MH and the test station I always use is well known for being very strict.

Brian

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I've lost touch of the UK MoT rules. Do those two faults mean a retest?

 

Things are a little different here. Those two faults, depending on how bad they are would be what we call a "1." That means, they have to be repaired before the next test, or they will be upgraded to a "2." That means repaired and within 30 days, or a "3" will be issued. That means a Prohibition of Use, and the vehicle is not allowed to be driven on the road. Get one of those on the test, and its tow truck time. They cannot be driven, or even towed behind another vehicle if all wheels are on the ground.

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19 hours ago, Gordon said:

And they vary from country to country within the EU - deep joy eh?

Gordon.

 

Nearly missed this one! Sometimes, I long for the old days when going out with the Motorhome meant nothing more that putting a gallon tin of water, a gallon tin of meths in and it was away we go. A lot of fun as well if they were mixed up and we tried to boil some of the meths to make tea or even drink it!

 

Nowadays its vingettes, crit'airs, umwelts, spare bulbs, alcotesters to name but a few.

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7 hours ago, Scania said:

I've lost touch of the UK MoT rules. Do those two faults mean a retest?

 

Things are a little different here. Those two faults, depending on how bad they are would be what we call a "1." That means, they have to be repaired before the next test, or they will be upgraded to a "2." That means repaired and within 30 days, or a "3" will be issued. That means a Prohibition of Use, and the vehicle is not allowed to be driven on the road. Get one of those on the test, and its tow truck time. They cannot be driven, or even towed behind another vehicle if all wheels are on the ground.

In the UK we have ''Advisories'' similar to your 1. We then have ''Major Fault'' which is a Fail but 10 days to fix and a free re-test. Finally the new category of ''Dangerous'' which means your vehicle cannot leave the Test Station and must be repaired by them, you can sometimes sign a release form but at your own risk if stopped by police especially with ANPR which can carry a big fine or vehicle seized . Mine are classed as Major but ok to drive. 

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7 hours ago, Scania said:

 

Nearly missed this one! Sometimes, I long for the old days when going out with the Motorhome meant nothing more that putting a gallon tin of water, a gallon tin of meths in and it was away we go. A lot of fun as well if they were mixed up and we tried to boil some of the meths to make tea or even drink it!

 

Nowadays its vingettes, crit'airs, umwelts, spare bulbs, alcotesters to name but a few.

I definately prefer tea to your meths:D

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On ‎2019‎-‎03‎-‎12 at 18:53, bikerbri said:

I definately prefer tea to your meths:D

One thing is certain. A drop of meths in tea makes it taste better than a drop of some of the vodka they have here in it! :D

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