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bikerbri

A million teabags and I'm sorted

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23 hours ago, bikerbri said:

1 million Tea Bags, Sugar & Milk, that's me sorted. :D

Travelling without the MH it's a credit card and a tooth brush ;)

Travelling with the MH it's the contents of a house :(

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After having toured France & Spain we have learned that for France we stock up on English food as they don't really cater for other cultures but in Spain we take far less as eating out there is similar to home, continental restaurants/bars galore but very thin on the ground in France so we used Carrefor Supermarkets if we needed to 'top up'.

On either destination however the 1 million teabags remains the same :D

Strangely enough being regulars in India its not all curries and spices (which I don't eat) but good quality English style food and readily available at very low cost. Pity I can't take the MH.

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I understand fully as regards teabags, which is a bit odd! When home, it would normally be the local blend of coffee I drink. However, when out in the camper its always tea, never coffee! Food though is a different thing. We dont normally take much more than simple stuff, preferring to eat the typical fare of whatever country we visit. We always make a point of looking for anything traditional in the region we are in.

 

Swedish food might be very strange to the average British person. Pea Soup is yellow, and usually served with mustard and thyme. Beans are dark brown, usually together with bacon. Herring is often eaten raw after being pickled with various things. That would be very typical thing to eat at celebrations such as Midsummer and Christmas. A delicacy, mostly in the north is "surströmming" which is Fermented Baltic Herring. Check out Youtube videos to get an impression of what that is like!

 

 

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Well Scania I have to say that having travelled to many countries over the years I give full attention to local culture and quite often dabble in trying local dishes but certainly nothing extreme.

I respect the various lifestyles I encounter and avoid giving offence where food is concerned or offered as a friendly gesture.

Tea is a classic example, in the Arab States & India it is a world away from what I know as my daily brew and even in the UK I have my brand favourite.

The MH provides not only the experience of different cultures but also the means to take a tried and tested diet:)

Roll on our next adventure.

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bikerbri, dont think that I was having a pop at you for one second. That was the farthest thing from my mind.

 

I do agree about the tea...its a lot different in most places. The thing I dont understand is the reason I cant drink coffee when out in the Camper!

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Absolutely not Scania, just making a general observation about the different countries we have experienced.

If its any consolation I can't drink coffee anywhere never mind a camper:D

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Bikerbri, if you ever come up this way and we end up meeting, then I'll be forced to drink tea even out of the camper...Mrs Scania is a tea drinker. Hates coffee!

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Very sensible woman you married there;)

Don't mind a trip to Sweden but you will have to do something about your weather, I don't do cold, hate snow with a passion and often wonder what the hell am I doing in UK????

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The thing that most people never realise about Sweden is that from north to south it is big. As a comparison, if you drive from the very north of France, to the very south, then thats about 2/3 of the north to south distance here! As is known, the temperature difference between north and south France is quite large. Its even bigger here! A few weeks ago, the north of Sweden had -39C (yes, minus!) whilst in the south, on the same day, it was a couple of degrees plus!

 

During summer, the sun is high in the sky -land of the midnight sun and all that - which makes it seem hotter. Around July being the hottest months. So, in Summer, cold is not really a problem.

 

In regards to snow, then I am in full agreement. I hate the stuff as well! Living in a rural area, we are dependent on vehicles to get to the shops which are several miles away. No fun in snowy weather, even with 4WD! About the only plus I can think of is that n this part of the village, we have a Road Association. In practical terms, that means we take care of the roads ourselves. That includes ploughing snow. Theres never any shortage of people wanting to operate the ploughs/snow blowers. They are quite a lot of fun.

 

So, to coin a new Motorhome Talk catchphrase, load up your teabags! :D

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By the time you read this I will be on Google Earth looking round your kingdom, not more Crit Air stickers I hope.

Spain is the top contender for me and already looking at a return to Toledo having made the mistake of only staying overnight but seeing it as we moved on next morning I knew we had to return one day, and as I don't do cities that's the best compliment I can give it.

My ideal would be 6 months in France and 6 in Spain only popping back here for the MOT but life is never that simple. A Brit I parked next to on a campsite in Benicassim does exactly that, he's parked there all year on what is now his own plot and only moves his MH for a trip back here for MOT or a tour inside Spain. For me it would be OlivaB)

Brian

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The nearest thing to crit'airs here are the congestion charges that are in Stockholm and Gothenburg. Dont know anything about the one in Stockholm, only the one in Gothenburg. Thats on the main motorway that runs through the city and charges are generated by ANPR. Its easy to avoid though, as it does not apply at weekends or in the evenings.

 

Not sure what my ideal trip would be, it tends to change. There are plenty places on my bucket list though, both near and far!

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To be honest, food wise there'e very little from the UK I would take to other countries as I do like to indulge in the local cuisine and I particularly like French cooking. Obviously there are things I've tried that I wouldn't choose to eat again, but that's equally true of UK food as much as any other country's. Don't get me wrong, I like UK food but for me tasting the food in other countries is all part of the holiday experience. I've eaten all kinds of meat including horse, camel, ostrich, kangaroo, goat and crocodile to name a few, and all sorts of raw fish have passed my lips along with various insects and grubs. Once you get past the idea that it's "not British" then most things are surprisingly palatable - but I draw the line at rotting fish. Two things that surprised me were the dry-fried mopane worms and locusts of Africa as both were rather nice. As for plants, well I've no idea what some of the leaves were but the locals ate them without any ill effects, so I felt there was no reason to refuse ;)

As you'll probably guess, I like most things from the goat and fruit mix of a Moroccan tajine, to a Scottish haggis with neeps and tatties. I'm not a lover of strong alcohol although I'm perfectly happy to sample the various concoctions one finds on ones travels even though, some are best only tried once. A glass of wine with a meal is one thing, but I have no enthusiasm for drinking without food. Obviously all journeys start with some UK food on board but once that's consumed, it local food only for me.

Gordon. 

 

 

 

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Fair play to you Gordon, I do 'dabble' in local dishes when abroad but mostly ends in disappointment to be fair.

One amusing episode while in Spain was Jayne ordering what she thought were mushrooms with her steak and turned out to be a large bowl of muscles which got quite a laugh but thankfully she does like them, in moderation, but not for me thank you so at least half were returned uneaten. This was in a remote village next to a ruined monastery where English & Spanish were lost in translation:D but the stunning location and freshly squeezed oranges made up for it.

A trip abroad for me is all about local traditions & cultures and having settled into a ''tourist'' campsite I literally head for the hills well away from crowds.

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Muscles are moules in French, schimelpilze in German and mejilons (not sure about he spelling) in Spanish, mushrooms are champignons in French, pilze in German but I've no idea what they call them in Spain other than I think it begins with "h". You'll probably gather that I tend to travel east rather than due south once over the channel but a holiday is still a holiday when ever away from home :)

For me, trying the local produce is all part of the fun, but like Jayne, I've had some interesting and unexpected dishes at times :D

Gordon.

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Jayne has written Champignons in her diary in respect to our upcoming France trip:) but just having had an MRI on her knee she may be facing a replacement (knee not me) so our trip may get delayed if she has the op.

Worse things happen at sea (according to the captain of the Titanic):D

Brian

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12 hours ago, Gordon said:

 

Muscles are ... schimelpilze in German...

 

Gordon: I would normally use the generic word of "muschel" for them in german, or if I was being more specific "miesmuschel"

 

Bikerbri: I do sympathise with you if your trip has to be cancelled or postponed. Our first planned trip for this year has been cancelled as well. Due mostly to an unmentionable event at the end of this month.

 

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2 hours ago, Scania said:

Gordon: I would normally use the generic word of "muschel" for them in german, or if I was being more specific "miesmuschel"

Every day is a school day :D

At school after we'd taken our French exams, we had a couple of weeks tuition in Spanish and German before the end of term. All I can remember of the Spanish is the name of the tuition book "Dolores Garcia e Pepe Alonso" (a bit like the "Janet and John" books used to teach primary school kids English) as for the content? Well most of that went in one ear and straight out of the other. Sadly the German was similar but a few useless words have stuck, such as verbleites benzin (and after visiting Switzerland, bleifreies benzin) and phrases like sie bitte das oil prufen (should there not be an umlaut over the u ?) but none of that is any use in the real world as so many people speak English.

Most of what I know of other languages has been a result of visiting other countries rather than what was taught at school, after all who needs to ask the time when wearing a watch, or directions to the toilet when there are signs? I do recall an interesting chat with an old lady in France many years ago when I was visiting with my friend, the grave of his uncle who'd died during the first world war and was burried in her village near Reims. He'd been interred in the local churchyard and tended by the locals ever since. Quite a moving experience, and something I shall always remember particularly as there were two German soldier's graves nearby, as a poignant reminder of the futility of war.

Gordon. 

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WW1 is my all consuming passion and something of a self proclaimed 'expert' having spent many years researching the whole sorry episode in human history.

My grandfather is my inspiration as he fell Missing In Action just after the Battle of Marne 1914, hence our intention to visit Ypres and the Menin Gate on our next trip to Belgium &France even though Ypres has no connection to Marne but does represent the futility of all the battles. He has no known grave to visit.

Like you I tend to pick up little phrases while abroad that helps to get by but being a lover of Spain touring France in 2017 we arrived at the manned toll booth on the Millau Viaduct Bridge and having parted with my Euro Notes said Gracias when given the change which caused roars of laughter in the booth and MH. Never a dull moment when I'm on tour:D

As for Scania's unmentionable event probably best we don't know;)

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1 hour ago, bikerbri said:

WW1 is my all consuming passion and something of a self proclaimed 'expert' having spent many years researching the whole sorry episode in human history.

My grandfather is my inspiration as he fell Missing In Action just after the Battle of Marne 1914, hence our intention to visit Ypres and the Menin Gate on our next trip to Belgium 

 

 I only found out a few years ago that my own grandfather served in France during WW1. He never even mentioned it to his children! Luckily, his service record was one of those that survived the WW2 german air raid, so I have been able to find out quite a bit about his service. Despite beng wounded twice, serving in a "Bombing Team" and being a machine gunner, he survived. I would not be here today if he hadnt!

 

bikerbri, do you by any chance use Ancestry?

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Fully paid up member of Ancestry Scania, have traced my family tree back to 1700 and ongoing.

Brian

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1 hour ago, bikerbri said:

Fully paid up member of Ancestry Scania, have traced my family tree back to 1700 and ongoing.

Brian

 

We're back to 1087 and stuck trying to find the father of "our Magnus" :D

 

Do you think my grandfather was lucky to survive the war?

 

Hope Gordon doesnt mind the slight case of drifting...

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I think anybody was lucky to survive it.

MH topics are a bit thin on the ground at the moment so I'm sure Gordon would understand

However just to balance things my MH is due it's MOT this week and I'm not expecting any suprises but as we say in England 6 eggs does not guarantee 6 chickens so hopefully the Gods are in the right karma;) My cup is always half full, never half empty so trip to Wales is highly likely..

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11 hours ago, Scania said:

Hope Gordon doesnt mind the slight case of drifting...

Not in the least that's the way conversations develop but as we've drifted a fair distance from the original question of motorhome loading, through a discussion of food, and now we're on to ancestry, I though it best to split the topic and restart with Brian's "million teabags" :D

Gordon.

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6 minutes ago, Gordon said:

Not in the least that's the way conversations develop but as we've drifted a fair distance from the original question of motorhome loading, through a discussion of food, and now we're on to ancestry, I though it best to split the topic and restart with Brian's "million teabags" :D

Gordon.

Brilliant title for a topic! It feels as if we are sitting round a table chatting as friends, letting the conversation move from subject to subject. All we need now is for someone to bring the tea.

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